330s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
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The 330s decade ran from January 1, 330, to December 31, 339.

Events

330

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Africa[edit]
  • Ezana, king of Axum, extends his area of control to the west. He defeats the Nobates, and destroys the kingdom of Meroë.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

331

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Arts and sciences[edit]
Religion[edit]

332


By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
  • Emperor Constantine I and his son Constantine II, aged 16, defeat the Goths in Moesia. The Goths become Roman allies and protect the Danube frontier.
  • Constantine I continues construction of a bridge in imitation of Trajan and his architect Apollodorus of Damascus across the Danube for forward-staging grounds for planned campaigns against local tribes.[2]
  • May 18 – Constantine I announces a free distribution of food to the citizens in Constantinople, similar to the food given out in the city of Rome. The amount is approximately 80,000 rations a day, doled out from 117 distribution points around the city.[3]

333

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
China[edit]

334

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

335

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

336

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
  • January 18Pope Mark succeeds Pope Sylvester I, as the 34th pope.
  • Pope Mark begins to build the basilica of San Marco; the church is devoted to St. Mark.
  • Arius, Alexandrian priest, collapses in the street at Constantinople (approximate date).
  • Pope Mark dies at Rome, after an 11-month reign. No successor is immediately found.
  • Emperor Constantine blends pagan and Christian rites to create Christmas, and sets the date of Jesus' birth as December 25th.

337

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]


Persia[edit]
China[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

338

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Persia[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Art[edit]
Religion[edit]

339

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

330

331

332

333

334

335

336

337

338

339

Deaths[edit]

330

Saint Helena

331

332

333

334

335

336

337

Emperor and Saint Constantine the Great

338

339

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "List of Rulers of Korea". metmuseum.org. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  2. ^ Primary source: Themistius, Oration 10.136/206
  3. ^ A.H.M. Jones, The Decline of the Ancient World (London: Routledge, 2014), 49-50. ISBN 9781317873051
  4. ^ a b Pohlsander, Hans A. (2004). The Emperor Constantine (2nd ed.). Routledge. p. 78. ISBN 978-0-415-31938-6.
  5. ^ Kraitser, Charles V. (1837). The Poles in the United States of America. Kiderlen and Stollmeyer. p. 17.
  6. ^ Townsend, George Henry (1862). The Manual of Dates (2nd ed.). Routledge, Warne & Routledge. p. 757.
  7. ^ "Chronology of Discoveries About the Sun". MrEclipse.com. 1999. Retrieved 2012-07-03.
  8. ^ World History of the Customs and Tariffs. World Customs Organization. 2003-01-01. ISBN 9782874920219.
  9. ^ Zürcher, Erik (1959). The Buddhist conquest of China. 1. Brill Archive. p. 16.
  10. ^ Hodgkin, Thomas (1892). Italy and Her Invaders. 1 (2nd ed.). Clarendon Press. p. 178.
  11. ^ Adkins, Lesley; Adkins, Roy A. (2004). Handbook to life in ancient Rome (2nd ed.). Infobase Publishing. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-8160-5026-0.
  12. ^ Mutschler, Fritz-Heiner; Mittag, Achim (2008). Conceiving the empire: China and Rome compared. Oxford University Press. p. 397. ISBN 978-0-19-921464-8.
  13. ^ Frédéric, Louis (1977). Encyclopaedia of Asian civilizations. 3. p. 178.
  14. ^ Pearce, Scott (2001). Spiro, Audrey G.; Ebrey, Patricia Buckley (eds.). Culture and Power in the Reconstitution of the Chinese Realm, 200–600. Harvard Univ Asia Center. p. 76. ISBN 978-0-674-00523-5.
  15. ^ Liu, Cheng-Tsai; Zheng-Cai, Liu; Hua, Ka (1999). A Study of Daoist Acupuncture. Blue Poppy Enterprises, Inc. p. 17. ISBN 978-1-891845-08-6.