Talk:Journey of the Magi

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[ WP:VfD ][edit]

The Journey of the Magi recently survived vfd. See: Talk:The Journey of the Magi/Delete -- Wile E. Heresiarch 08:11, 20 Jun 2004 (UTC)

Comments[edit]

Eliot looked at all aspects of the thoughts of the Magi. Coming to belive that the Christ was born, but not understanding how it was related to death...and whose death, whose birth? I believe that the epiphany was not strictly limited to the Nativity, but to their own lives. Now seeing what they had done wrong before and looking at their old life in some kind of closure. Yet, at the same time, they don't feel as if they are able to see past their own world. Eliot uses the characters from Gerontion in this one man and some characteristics of other characters in several other poems. The allusions used were very strong! Just a few were the "three trees in the sky", Christ's death; "Old White Horse", his second coming; "tavern bush", the holy communion; "Tavern with leaves over the lintel"; the paschal lamb whose blood was smeard on lintels of Israel- the blood money of Judas (SUFFERING OF CHRIST BEFORE CRUCIFIXTION); "six hands"; soldiers who cast lots at his feet. Because that he sees these things and has become conscience of what he has been doing, the arrival at the nativity was very anticlimatic (many believe that the magi were rejoicing during this time, Eliot's depiction shows sadness and confusion and the lack of understanding.) It is very important that the fact that part of his poem came straight from the archbishop that he had come to convert under. The influence of the Anglican church probably was the most direct form of knowledge of the Magi's disposition.

This is my strongest form of brief discussion: Steven English EagleE108@yahoo.com

Title[edit]

The poem's actually called "Journey of the Magi". The fact that there is no definitive article like "the", or even an "a" shows that the metaphorical/spiritual of the journey has not ended, and so as it is not yet in the past, there cannot be a "the".

Just thought that was important. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.152.0.37 (talk) 21:42, 21 January 2008 (UTC)[]


The Text[edit]

The text of the poem is available at: http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/the-journey-of-the-magi/ , but I am quite sure that since the poet only died in 1965 it would still be under copyright. (http://www.poemhunter.com/PoemHunter/show.asp?p=Copyright/inc_copyright.htm )

Is there a Wikipedia linking policy? Mfgreen 02:56, 27 December 2006 (UTC)[]

Interesting copyright policy of Poem Hunter. You need permission (and prior permission at that) to copy anything of their's but they publish anything and the owner has to hunt down their poem and say stop. Also, Poem Hunter claims permission to publish anything that is sent them even without knowledge that the owner has read their copyright and permission policy. WikiParker 12:07, 27 December 2006 (UTC)[]

Lancelot Andrews[edit]

I'm a little shocked that there's no mention of Lancelot Andrews (on whose sermon the poem was partly based, very consciously on Eliot's part) in the article. Anyone with a proper understanding of the subject care to change this?

Latin Spelling Error?[edit]

To briefly preface, I have an elementary grasp of Latin so forgive me if I am wrong. This article quotes "...in solsitio brumali, the very dead of winter." The Latin word 'solsitio', should presumably be 'solstitio': in the solstice. Checking the given source 'solsitio' is also written. After consulting a few dictionaries and wiktionary as well 'solsitio' does not seem to be a common alternative or an alternative at all. If it is incorrect, I believe it could be a simple spelling error in the original written manuscript [1] (as the manuscript also contains some interesting spelling variations like Jerosolymam for Jerusalem) that was faithfully transcribed onto the cited webpage as that is the purpose of that webpage. However if it is an error would it be worth noting? I know this is probably a very minute detail but I have been thinking about it for some time. Note I have not altered the actual article page. Mr.Sagdiyev (talk) 05:34, 26 July 2021 (UTC)[]

References